“Seasoning Few Pockets” Tanka 2163


(November 12, 2018)

treed and corruption

salt-n-pepper of “progress”

seasons few pockets

 

fire-unions and “peacers”

fight sound forest policies*

 

*(Bureau of Land Management, The National Park Service, and other Interior Department wig-bigs only fairly recently caught on to what the First Families here long ago knew and practiced: careful land management – controlled and we now called “prescribed” burns – strengthen trees and weed out the ones which drink too deeply of scarce water and eliminate much of the understory and debris which currently plague so much of California now from North-to-South at the cost of lives and property which well may result in a “ban guns” approach to forestry management.  Did you ever see the first photographs of Wild California in the mid-19th Century?  Large vistas of open grassland.  The native peoples did that deliberately by burning the trees which kept encroaching the grasslands – lands which fed deer and other edibles which do not thrive in forests, regardless of the impressions you got watching “Bambi.” The build-up of understory and debris causes the resultant fire to be hotter and taller and thus devastates the forest from high-peak treeline to the grasslands, killing all before and not proving beneficial to the mature taller trees.  And then we come to the 12-billion board feet of harvested lumber from national forestry reserves each year before the recent return to stupidity which allows barely a 10th of that number depriving much-needed revenues to the federal -and state? – coffers and helps keep home- and office-building prices low by providing cheap and easily harvested wherewithall necessaries instead of artificially inflating the tills at developers’ cashboxes and their cohorts in such trade which trade emphasizes cash flow over actual accomplishment.  We have helped California – and the rest of the nation I fear – turn itself upside down and inside out for the aims of those who think America is a cow and needs to be milked only in approved ways.  When Yellowstone last was allowed to burn freely late last century in what the Interior Department’s think-boxes said would result in greater feed for the grazing animals and more food for the predators and better land management practices overall, they were just following Native conservation practices hundreds of years old at the very least.  But the forestry service and Interior Department backed off the “Let It Burn” stance in the face of public backlash – what do you mean a whole generation of no forest, no Rocky-N-Bullwinkle, no Yogi and Boo-Boo? Stop the fires! And they id. Land use and forestry management -stio-the-fires policies keep boards-of-directors happy watching climbing charts.  We, on the other burnt hand, see and bemoan the generational loss of those great trees.  Perhaps instead of disapproving people who manage to move uphill almost past the natural treelines from keeping the brush and debris naturally collecting as trees grow, age and shed limbs and leaves removed from the land – and their homes – by controlled burns, we can adopt more sound and sensible approaches instead of marching madness of destructive fires every few decades as our television commentators aghast and aglow – over booming ratings – tell us nothing at all.  It’s not the purview of The Sierra Club or any other so-called wildlife preservation outfit alone.  Real people with real stakes in the game can and should educate themselves about many things wild and free.  And in the meantime they might learn why it costs three fortunes to use real lumber in a home and why so many old homes hereabouts in Central Florida seem to weather hurricanes, nor’easters and tornadic thunderstorms so well with just plain real wood which goes on into its second century of fine service. Thus endeth this part of the sermon. There will be no collection.

 

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