6 thoughts on ““I Fear Not Olding”

    • Made Old into a gerund, I believe. When “Olding” cropped up I just hadda write something to celebrate its birth. Something akin to “Wilding” from A Clockwork Orange, I believe. I played The Writer in an oral interpretation of that work at University of South Florida last century. And I wanted so to be a bullyboy (or whatever they were called…forgotten that part – and mine – in the interregnum.

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      • When first I found…and then is was not considered either by Webster or his pal as archaic…”coign” I was enthralled. I eschew even the possibilities of coin-age confusion in its favor. A good reason, Shehanne, to become quickly as possible An Editor, which may be defined as one who sits studying the rime of a glass of spirits gone to sheen, unless one chooses to be less charitable. The best – and worst – kind of editor I have served in several sentences is one who plays both ends of the flute: writer and editor and learns – hopefully – the delights of undither come deadline. When a correspondent and delightful resource in one of my local small-town dailies remarked to me when she asked her middle son if he ever read my editorial columns and not just my sports columns – or even stories in sports and elsewhere throughout the paper, she said he replied – warily, “Yes. why?” We both quick-laughed, knowing there was more. “So, I asked him about your editorial page columns,” she continued. “He said, quickly, ‘yup’.” “Did you understand all of them,” she added. “He looked at me as if I were from Mars, J,” she added. “‘Mommm,’ he drew the word out when I had been foolish. So, what did you do? Did you ask J? ‘He told me to look it up, and that he took pains to put the words he figured some might need help on in what he called Context.’ I had to look that one up.” she laughed again.
        I think I might have mentioned this tale before, Shehanne, but the upshot was – and remains – telling for and to me: The woman asked her husband if he had a dictionary at home when he was growing up, and confessed to him she had not had one at home as a child either. “So we decided to go out and buy all three of our sons and our daughter each an unabridged dictionary…and we got one of us as well.”
        Right then I knew I could quit this filthy habit – S. L. Clemens said writing was not such a bad thing so long as it was done in private and the writer washed their hands afterward.
        I compromised by holding a beer and a shot glass in each hand in lieu of soap-n-such.

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