1933

When I “retweeted” this I thought I wrote the pithiest of replies…I so admire a confirmed Laze. The commentary was both haiku and tanka and I shall repost same someday soon…but now I have a possible tropical storm to celebrate…after just planting okra.

late night sounds of steps
either deer or forty thieves
too lazy to look

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stolen from Bruce Jewett’s wonderful blog haikuforcats: he swiped from Dan

There are many definitions of haiku. This is one of the best. “Haiku is more than a form of poetry; it is a way of seeing the world. Each haiku captures a moment of experience; an instant when the ordinary suddenly reveals its inner nature and makes us take a second look at the event, […]

via Haiku — anicca

Of Flame Keepers and Writers

If you haven’t already: pull up a chaise lounge – the meal you are about to be fed will require such – and read, see, watch, Shehanne Moore’s delightful piece. This must be sent straitway to my Nieces-2-Pieces vie Snagglepus Mail and much enjoys all around!

shehanne moore

Ken : – In 1942 Annie’s grandson is in the North African desert. Near a place called El Alamein. He’s never been abroad before… (Exit put on Churchill hat.)

Em : – … unless you count a summer holiday to the seaside…at Broughty Ferry! Now in the North African Desert  Boab’s future career plans don’t involve jute. ( Three WW2 soldiers kick  ball.)

Boab : – What a goal! When the war’s ower I’m gonna be a professional – I’m no goin back to work in a mull an deh afore meh time like meh granny.

Tam : – Deh afore yir time? Yir in a war!

Boab : – Hope an faith! Besides jute’s on the wey oot.

(Kick the ball again. Enter Officer.)

Officer : – (Bellowing) Get that ball away and get fell in. On parade now!

Boab : What’s this aboot, Sir?

Officer : Yours not…

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